MASSE DISCIPLINE

(January Issue 2005)

This month's Artistic pool shot is from the Masse Discipline and has a Degree of Difficulty (DOD) of 10.

* DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS SHOT WITHOUT THE OWNERS PERMISSION!

This shot is a vertical Masse and is quite a challenging shot. Let's look at the set up. The B object ball is on the right side of B pocket and frozen against the point. The object ball's pocket side is even with the slate cut. The cue ball is placed on the second diamond line, (the headstring), and may be moved away from the cushion up to two ball's width.

The objective of this shot is to shoot the cue ball with a vertical Masse stroke, past B ball. After the cue ball's trailing edge passes the object ball's forward edge the cue ball will then spin back to make B ball in the side pocket. The cue ball may contact the long rail after passing B ball and a scratch is allowed. The cue ball may not touch B ball until after it has fully passed it.

Here are a few helpful hints to guide you. You can execute this shot with your own playing cue but a Masse cue would make the shot easier. The elevation of your cue should be between 80 and 85 degrees depending on equipment. I cue the cue ball at 6:45 and my aim is at three fourths of a diamond to the right of pocket C. Six O' clock would be where the vertical axis of the cue ball is aimed, so you are using left English. I use a medium hard to hard stroke.

After making this shot on my second attempt at the North American Artistic Pool Continental Qualifier in October of 2001, I set a World Record for the most points scored for the four most points scored for the four hardest disciplines in all continental qualifiers ever held. The record still stands today for those 16 shots.

Happy New Year
Keep Stroking!




JUMP DISCIPLINE

(December Issue 2004)

This month's Artistic pool shot is from the Jump Discipline and has a Degree of Difficulty (DOD) of 9.

This shot is another favorite that has been shown on ESPN's Trick Shot Magic.

Let's look at the set-up. Object ball # 1 is frozen to the long rail on the head string line. Object ball # 2 is frozen to # 1 and also on the head string line. Object ball D is centered between the pocket points. The cue ball is frozen to the cushion as the diagram shows. The objective of this shot is to shoot the cue ball with a jump stroke into # 1 object ball, which clears # 2 object ball frozen to it. The cue ball jumps over # 2 object ball and travels two cushions to make D balls pocket letter designated. Here are a few helpful hints to aid you for successfully executing this great shot. This shot should be executed with your playing cue and not a jump cue. Elevate your cue between 20 and 30 degrees depending on how far you place the cue ball from # 1 object ball. Aim for a full hit on the # 1 object ball. With the cue ball frozen to the rail it will veer to the left a bit because the nose of the cushion is above the ball's horizontal axis. I use a medium hard stroke on this shot. On this shot I will use top left English hitting the ball at about 10 O'clock. I place the center of my cue ball one and a quarter diamonds up from pocket D and frozen to the cushion. When shooting this shot you are allowed to hit an extra cushion by D ball and you are allowed to scratch. The # 2 object ball must not move by any means. Best of luck on this one.

Next month's Artistic Shot will be from the Masse Discipline and have a (DOD) of 10.




SPEED CONTROL SHOT

(November Issue 2004)

This month's Artistic Pool Shot is from the Stroke Discipline and has a Degree of Difficulty (DOD) of 9.

This shot has a great deal of luck to it. This shot would be a great shot for the carnies, (carnival people) to set up for you to attempt to win a big stuffed animal.

The odds would be in their favor if they gave you two chances for $2.00.

The set up for this shot is quite easy. You can start by placing the solo object ball on the head spot. Place a new piece of chalk on top of the object ball with the well of the chalk facing down. The cue ball is in hand anywhere behind the head string. The objective of this shot is to shoot the cue ball five cushions (per diagram pattern) and have the cue ball touch the object ball on the spot without knocking the chalk cube off of the ball. This shot requires a great sense of touch for exact speed control. If you wish you may shoot the shot from the other side of the table, using the mirror image. You may position the cube chalk anywhere on top of the object ball.

The only helpful hints I can share with you are:
1) Cue the cue ball in the same spot each time. By doing this you will have consistency. I use a touch of top right English.
2) Vary the angle into the first rail until you find the correct angle for a solid hit on the object ball, and
3) Adjust the speed of your stroke by having a consistent tempo to your warm up strokes.

I hope you have fun with this one.
Next month's Artistic Shot will be from the Jump Discipline and have a (DOD) of 9.




AROUND THE WORLD SHOT

(October Issue 2004)

This month's Artistic Pool Shot is from the Bank/Kick Discipline and has a Degree of Difficulty (DOD) of 9. This shot is an oldie but a goodie! This shot was a favorite of many of the legends that performed Exhibitions such as Mosconi, Caras, Anderson, Moore, Rudolf, Peterson and of course Fats.

Let's look at the set up for this shot. You begin by placing one F ball frozen to the foot cushion and the other F ball by the F pocket. The cue ball is in hand and can be placed anywhere in the box zone. The objective of the shot is to shoot the cue ball into the frozen F ball, banking it four cushions around the table. While that object ball is banking around the table, the cue ball follows to make F ball at F pocket, and then gets out of the way to allow the making of the banked frozen F ball in the some pocket. Here are a couple of special notes. Cue ball contact with foot cushion prior to making F ball by pocket is not mandatory. There is no penalty for scratching.

Here are a few helpful hints to help you execute this shot. The cue ball is in line with the frozen object ball and their line of centers are aimed to come through 2 1/2 diamonds up the long rail from pocket C. This is my starting point. If the banked F ball is hitting to the right of pocket F move the cue ball a little to the right. If the ball is hitting to the left of pocket F move the cue ball a little to the left. On this shot it is important to aim at a full ball hit and use top right English at about 2 O'clock. I use a medium hard stroke on this shot. Another great hint is to place the F ball in pocket F a little to the left of center pocket. After the cue ball hits the object ball the cue ball will get out of the way because the cue ball will be cutting the object ball to the left so the cue ball will carom to the right, thus letting the cue ball escape. With some serious practice you should be able to make this shot one out of three attempts.

Next month's Artistic Shot will be from the Stroke Discipline and have a DOD of 9.




THROUGH THE GAP

(September Issue 2004)

This month's Artistic Pool Shot is from the Follow Discipline and has a Degree of Difficulty (DOD) of 9. This is a specialty shot of Tom Dr. Cue Rossmanís. You can almost " Bet The Farm" he will make this shot within 3 attempts. As I am writing this article on Aug.18th, I can tell you that I've set up and practiced this shot by shooting the shot more than 60 times in the last month to get ready for my competition at the Rivera in Las Vegas. The competition is the 2004 Las Vegas Artistic Pool Championship. We have a field of 25, and yes all of the greatest will be there. Look for the outcome in this issue or October's issue.

Let's look at the set up for this great shot. You begin by placing B ball two ball's width out from the long rail, with the right edge of the ball in a straight line to the left point of pocket B. The E ball is frozen to the B ball and is also two ball's width out from the long rail. The A ball is frozen to the E ball and angled so the line of centers between E and A ball are pointed to the left point of pocket A for the allowance of throw. The C ball is between the pocket points of C pocket. You can now set up the row of blocking balls with a two ball space as shown. The cue ball is in hand anywhere behind the line X. The objective of this shot is to shoot the cue ball hitting E ball first then carom to B ball and then travel with a timed curb through "Gap" in the row of blocking balls to pocket the C ball. You will be making all for object ball's as pocket letter designated. The cue ball may contact an extra cushion by C ball and a scratch is allowed. The balls on either side of the "Gap" May Not Be Touched as the cue ball curves through.

Here are a few helpful hints to help you execute this shot. The cue ball's placement is critical for this shot. I place the cue ball just behind the X line with the cue ball's right edge in line with A ball's left edge. I use top left English, at 11 o'clock, and a medium hard stroke. When the cue ball contacts the E ball first the vertical axis of the cue ball will be in line with the right edge of the E ball, a half ball aim. You are now cutting the E ball to the left. This is a must or E ball will not bank cross side. If the cue ball strikes any of the first 5 ball's out from the long rail youíre shooting too softly and if the cue ball strike's any of the second group 5 ball's you are hitting too hard. Be sure your cue ball is level and you follow through. This set up is for a nine foot table so you will have to make adjustments if you attempt this shot on an eight or seven foot table. With some serious practice you will be able to make this great shot.

Next month's Artistic Shot will be from the Bank / Kick Discipline and have a D O D of 9.




MIKE'S POWER DRAW SHOT

(August Issue 2004)

This month's Artistic pool Shot is from the Draw Discipline and has a Degree of Difficulty (DOD) of 10. My good friend Mike Massey devised this highly skilled stroke shot almost 30 years ago, when he started doing exhibitions. It was designed as a one pocket shot then. When I perform this shot in an exhibition I set up the shot as diagramed with the reference ball being the eight ball. I informed the audience that I'm playing a game of last pocket 8 ball and I need to pocket the C ball in C pocket and get shape for the eight of course the C pocket is where I made my last ball. The C ball is a stripe and F ball is a solid. Most of the audience is astonished when you execute this shot to perfection.

Let's now get to the set up. The C ball is in line with the first diamond from pocket C and frozen to the foot cushion. The cue ball is frozen to the foot cushion and is about a ball and a half distance from C ball. The F ball is centered in F pocket to block a cue ball scratch. The objective is to shoot the cue ball to C ball, pocketing C ball in C pocket. Then the cue ball draws 3 or 4 cushions to the position zone near F pocket. Here are a few helpful hints to help you execute this fantastic shot. Aim the center of the cue ball at the right edge of the C ball, your bridge length should be at least 8 inches and make sure your bridge is firm. You will need to use a very powerful (fast) stroke and cue the cue ball at 5:15. Mike also suggests that you let your whole upper arm collapse into the shot on the follow through. This is one of many skill shots that Mike has personally helped me with. Thanks again Mike for all of your great knowledge you have shared with me.

Don't get discouraged if you are not able to execute this shot at a consistency rate of better than 60 percent.

Next month's Artistic Shot will be from the Follow Discipline and have a DOD of 9.




OVER & UNDER

(July Issue 2004)

This month's Artistic shot is from the prop/novelty/ Special Arts Discipline and has a Degree of Difficulty (DOD) of 9. To set this shot up place the bridge on the rail tops as diagramed. Place F ball's edge, closest to bridge, flush with the back edge of the bridge. The D ball is centered between the pocket points. The cue ball and F ball can be placed anywhere in the 1 by 1 diamond square area. The objective of this shot is to shoot the cue ball with a jump draw stroke into F ball. The F ball goes under the bridge and the cue ball jumps over the bridge and then draws back under the bridge to D ball. You must pocket both object balls as pocket letter designated. A scratch is allowed and the cue ball may contact the long rail on the way back to D ball.

Here are a couple of tips to help you execute this skill shot. I place my F ball 1 & 1/4 balls distance away from the long rail. Make sure that the ball goes underneath the bridge. If it doesn't, put something under the bridge head to raise it. I line up the cue ball with the F ball so that I'm barely cutting the F ball to the left. Now because I'm cutting the F ball to the left the cue ball will come back to the right as it draws back towards the D pocket. I place my cue ball about 1 & 1/2 balls width away from the short rail. The elevation of my cue for the jump draw stroke is about 35 degrees. My basic bridge that I use for this shot is on top of the short rail. I use a medium hard stroke for this shot. In my opinion I think BCA Hall of Famer Lou " Machine Gun" Butera executed this shot better than anyone. You should get the owners permission before you attempt this shot. Next month's Artistic shot will be from the Draw Discipline and has a (DOD) of 10, a great skill shot. Don't miss it.




TRICK AND/OR FANCY DISCIPLINE

(June Issue 2004)

This month's Artistic Shot is from the trick and or fancy discipline and has a Degree of Difficulty (DOD) of 8.

Although this looks like an easy set up shot it isn't. Depending on the newness and quality of cloth on the table the two A balls may need to be adjusted as much as one full ball up towards the center of pocket E. Let's look at the set up of this shot.

The A ball that is closest to cushion #3, the long rail, is one balls width from cushion #3 and the right edge is flush to the point of E pocket. The second A ball is frozen with allowance for the throw effect to pocket A. The C ball is centered between the pocket points. You have the cue ball in hand or as the diagram suggests. The objective of this shot is to shoot the cue ball into the closest A ball then the cue ball travels 3 cushions to C ball. You must make all 3 object balls as pocket letter designated. The first hit A ball banks around the other A ball and goes first in pocket A. A scratch is allowed and the cue ball may contact an extra cushion by the C ball. Here are a few helpful hints. When shooting this shot on new cloth I move the pair of A balls up towards the center of E pocket one full ball.

Now A ball by cushion #3, it's left edge is flush with the left point of E pocket. My cue ball is a half a diamond segment away from the first A ball and about a half a balls width from the long rail. I use top left English and fractionally aim at a half of a ball on the A balls right side. Use a moderate stroke. Good luck with this one.




THE SHORT MASSE

(May Issue 2004)

This months Artistic Shot is from the Masse Discipline and has a Degree of Difficulty (DOD) of 8. This skillful Masse is from the movie the Hustler. Here is a piece of trivia. This shot was also in the music video Bad To The Bone. Willie Mosconi performed the shot for each one.

Object ball A (at left) is approximately 1/8 inch from the cue ball or can be froze to the cue ball. A ball (at right) is 2 balls width away from the slate cut of pocket A and 1/2 inch off of the cushion. The object of this shot is to shoot the cue ball with a vertical Masse into A ball (at left) and toward the cushion of A ball (at right). After stroking the cue ball you will pocket A ball (at left) first and the cue ball will go up table as diagrammed and come back to pocket A ball (at right).

Here are a couple of special notes: The cue ball doesn't have to contact the cushion above A ball at right and a scratch is allowed. Here are a couple of helpful hints on executing this great shot. The elevation of your cue should be approximately 80 to 85 degrees. While standing behind the cue ball and aiming the cue ball to pocket B you would be cueing the cue ball at about a 7 o'clock position on the cue ball while looking down on the cue ball. Don't try this shot with a hard tip, use a medium or soft tip. This shot can be made with a regular cue or a Masse cue.

If you want to try this shot in your billiard room or sports bar get permission from the owner before you attempt it. If not you may be paying them to recover their table.

Next months Artistic Shot is from the Trick or Fancy Discipline and has a DOD of 8.




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